Lessons Learned

Camdiluv ♥ / Foter

My daughter turns seventeen today! Seventeen isn’t a milestone birthday for anything in particular; you don’t start school, or get your license or become legal to drink, but it is very important to me. I did many things in my life before I got married and started a family, and at the age of 38 I was truly blessed with a daughter!

She would say I have been a great mom but I haven’t felt that way myself and maybe all mom’s think they could always do better.  I like the way we are and even if she wasn’t my daughter I would want to be her friend. I admire her courage, integrity, spontaneity, intellect, height (she is 5 inches taller than me), tenacity, spunk, opinions, and heart.

For the past seventeen years I believe I have been more the student and she the teacher. At each stage I have learned valuable lessons from her and in honor of her birthday am sharing some with all of you.

Lessons I’ve Learned from My Daughter

  • Onions are round and look like a ball, but they don’t bounce very well.
  • Even though powdered cocoa looks like chocolate, it doesn’t taste near as good!
  • Pumpkins are round and look like a ball, but they don’t bounce very well either. (And it is very embarrassing to your mother if you choose to try it out on live television!)
  • Just because you like peaches one day, doesn’t mean they won’t end up on the floor the next.
  • Spoons are nice, but sometimes your hand works better when you’re really hungry.
  • Boxes of cake mixes make great building blocks and step stools.
  • My most expensive silk negligee  looks better on a toddler as a Halloween costume than it ever did on me.
  • A piece of masking tape can occupy a person for at least 10-15 minutes.
  • Sliding on the tile floor in your stocking feet is really fun.
  • Everything doesn’t have to be done a certain way to be right.
  • Relaxing is not a crime.
  • You can accept others easier if you accept yourself.
  • Perfectionism is overrated.
  • Family traditions are important and very comforting.
  • We can agree to disagree and still be okay.
  • Mom’s aren’t always right and that’s okay too.
  • It is fun to share makeup and clothes!
  • Families are happier with a puppy in the house.
  • Privacy is important!
  • You never get too old to need your Mom.
  • We will learn from each other the rest of our lives.

Top Ten Tips for Trick-or-Treating

Pink Sherbet Photography / Foter

Pumpkins, scary sounds, masks, costumes, blowing leaves, and lots of sugar, it must be October! I enjoy Halloween as much as anyone, but I do admit that, as a parent, there are precautions that must be taken to be sure my child is safe while having a good time. Before your children venture out this October 31st, go over these ten tips and explain why they are important. Yeah it’s boring and time consuming but do it anyway; it’s a parent thing!

1. Make sure children are accompanied by an adult or responsible teenager when they go door to door.

2. If children are going to be out after dark, make sure they carry a flashlight. Make a fun one yourself with a plastic pumpkin cut to fit over the front of a regular flashlight.

3. Teach your children to use the sidewalks if they can. If there are no sidewalks, walk on the left side of the street facing cars.

4. Know which friends your children will be with and which route they are taking.

5. Leave your porch light on so children will know it’s OK to visit your home.

6. Instruct children to never to eat anything until they are home and the treats have been carefully examined. Cut and wash fruit before eating. Throw away anything unwrapped. Check the wrappers of commercial treats for evidence of tampering.

7. Look for the label Flame Resistant on purchased costumes or use fire resistant fabric or treat it with fire resistant spray if you make costumes yourself.

8. Small children should never carve pumpkins. Instead, let your child draw a face on the pumpkin with markers and paint, or use stickers to decorate.

9. Keep candles, pumpkins with candles, matches and lighters in a place that children and pets can’t reach and away from curtains and other objects that could catch fire.

10. Be extra careful when driving. Slow down and watch for children who might be so excited they forget safety rules.